meat and two veg

• a slang expression for a mans 'equipment'.

Londonisms dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • meat and two veg — ˌmeat and twoˈ veg 7 [meat and two veg] noun uncountable (BrE, informal) a dish of meat with potatoes and another vegetable, considered as typical traditional Brit …   Useful english dictionary

  • meat and two veg — (BrE infml) a meal consisting of some meat and two different vegetables, one of which is potato. It is a traditional British meal, although now British people enjoy a greater variety of foods, and ‘meat and two veg’ is sometimes seen as old… …   Universalium

  • meat and two veg — (your) meat and two veg British, humorous a man s sexual organs. I tell you what, his trousers were so tight you could see his meat and two veg! …   New idioms dictionary

  • meat and two veg — British, informal a traditional type of meal, often found in Britain, which is basic and slightly boring, usually a piece of meat and two vegetables. The food is very much meat and two veg you won t find any of your fancy French cuisine here …   New idioms dictionary

  • meat and two veg — noun a) A stereotypical standard dinner, with a meat and two kinds of vegetable. b) The male genitals …   Wiktionary

  • meat and two veg — n British the male genitals. A working class vul garism dating from the days when these components constituted the standard British meal, as advertised in cafes, boarding houses, etc. (Veg is short for vegetables and is spoken with a soft g .)… …   Contemporary slang

  • meat and two veg — Meaning Traditional English meal. Origin Also a jokey reference to male genitalia (work it out for yourself) …   Meaning and origin of phrases

  • meat and two veg — Noun. The male genitals …   English slang and colloquialisms

  • your meat and two veg — (your) meat and two veg British, humorous a man s sexual organs. I tell you what, his trousers were so tight you could see his meat and two veg! …   New idioms dictionary

  • meat —    1. a person viewed sexually    Male or female, heterosexually:     Away, you mouldy rogue, away. I am meat for your master. (Shakespeare, 2 Henry N)    or homosexually:     Together, he and Jimmy had shared some of the choicest meat inside the …   How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

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