dog and bone


dog and bone
• - Rhyming Slang for 'phone'. Used in it's long and short form (dog). Not used as widely as it once was. Terms such as blower and bell seem more popular nowadays.

Londonisms dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • dog and bone — noun A telephone. Oi, keep the noise down! Im talking to my old lady on the dog and bone …   Wiktionary

  • dog and bone — Meaning Telephone. Origin Cockney rhyming slang. In my youth, which was spent in England, but not within the sound of Bow Bells, my friends and I used the phrase telling bone for telephone. I ve not heard that anywhere since …   Meaning and origin of phrases

  • dog and bone — n British a telephone. An example of rhyming slang which is still used today. It is usu ally used of the appliance rather than the action. ► Get on the dog to him and find out when he s coming …   Contemporary slang

  • dog and bone — I Australian Slang telephone II Cockney Rhyming Slang Phone She s always on the dog. III Everyday English Slang in Ireland phone …   English dialects glossary

  • Dog and bone — telephone …   Dictionary of Australian slang

  • dog and bone — Noun. Telephone. Cockney rhyming slang …   English slang and colloquialisms

  • dog and bone — noun Colloquial the telephone. {rhyming slang} …   Australian English dictionary

  • The Dog and the Bone — is a fable ascribed to Aesop. According to the story, a dog was carrying a bone over a bridge. Looking down into the water, the dog saw its own reflection, which looked to him like another dog carrying another bone. Wanting the other dog s bone… …   Wikipedia

  • Meat and bone meal — Meat bone meal Meat and bone meal (MBM) is a product of the rendering industry. It is typically about 50% protein, 35% ash, 8 12% fat, and 4 7% moisture. It is primarily used in the formulation of animal feed to improve the amino acid profile of… …   Wikipedia

  • Beef and bone meal — Beef and bone meal, as stated by AAFCO, is the rendered product from beef tissues, including bone, exclusive of any added blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents, except in such amounts as may occur unavoidably …   Wikipedia


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